INTERNET MASHES RADIO INTO LITTLE BITTY PIECES!      Don�t think radio�s a-changin�?  Don�t think that radio hasn�t spawned  several busines
INTERNET MASHES RADIO INTO LITTLE BITTY PIECES!

Don�t think radio�s a-changin�? Don�t think that radio hasn�t spawned
several business that will someday in the next few years overtake it?

Over the past few years, radio has seen a decline in listeners mostly to a
website called Pandora.com that plays music based on the listener�s tastes.
So far the online radio service has topped 40 million registered users.
Radio�s one advantage, of use solely in automobiles, is being usurped by
advancing technology such as Pandora entering Ford automobiles (). Other
Internet only radio stations have taken some of radio�s listeners including
LastFM.com which similarly to Pandora plays an Internet station tailor-made
to the consumer. Over 35 million users come to this website every month.

Disc Jockeys are finding work outside the traditional radio model as
well. Adam
Carrolla, who once was a morning talk-show host in Los Angeles, was fired
when his radio station switched formats. He immediately bought some basic
recording equipment from a local music shop and started a podcast or show
made specifically for downloading off the internet. His programs have been
downloaded more than 50 million times over the past year, and Carrolla
himself says that he feels radio’s future lies in podcasts rather than
traditional radio or the satellite radio provider Sirius XM.

The role that was once played by many DJ�s, to announce the title and
artists of songs played on the radio, has been replaced by one of countless
apps or programs downloaded to smart phones over the Internet. The world�s
leading app for song identification is Shazam. This program �listens� to
the song playing from a radio or other source and identifies it. This has
lead to bigger sales of the songs identified by Shazam, and now the company
is partnering with the television cable network, Syfy. The promotion asks
users of Shazam to identify certain songs played during one of the Syfy
programs to receive special rewards .

These aspects of radio are not found inside a radio station building or
owned by one radio company.. These are industries created out of another
industry�s shortcomings. People rely on these new businesses for music, for
talk entertainment, and for music identification the way they once relied on
one radio industry.

INTERNET MASHES RADIO INTO LITTLE BITTY PIECES!      Don�t think radio�s a-changin�?  Don�t think that radio hasn�t spawned  several busines
INTERNET MASHES RADIO INTO LITTLE BITTY PIECES!

Don�t think radio�s a-changin�? Don�t think that radio hasn�t spawned
several business that will someday in the next few years overtake it?

Over the past few years, radio has seen a decline in listeners mostly to a
website called Pandora.com that plays music based on the listener�s tastes.
So far the online radio service has topped 40 million registered users.
Radio�s one advantage, of use solely in automobiles, is being usurped by
advancing technology such as Pandora entering Ford automobiles (). Other
Internet only radio stations have taken some of radio�s listeners including
LastFM.com which similarly to Pandora plays an Internet station tailor-made
to the consumer. Over 35 million users come to this website every month.

Disc Jockeys are finding work outside the traditional radio model as
well. Adam
Carrolla, who once was a morning talk-show host in Los Angeles, was fired
when his radio station switched formats. He immediately bought some basic
recording equipment from a local music shop and started a podcast or show
made specifically for downloading off the internet. His programs have been
downloaded more than 50 million times over the past year, and Carrolla
himself says that he feels radio’s future lies in podcasts rather than
traditional radio or the satellite radio provider Sirius XM.

The role that was once played by many DJ�s, to announce the title and
artists of songs played on the radio, has been replaced by one of countless
apps or programs downloaded to smart phones over the Internet. The world�s
leading app for song identification is Shazam. This program �listens� to
the song playing from a radio or other source and identifies it. This has
lead to bigger sales of the songs identified by Shazam, and now the company
is partnering with the television cable network, Syfy. The promotion asks
users of Shazam to identify certain songs played during one of the Syfy
programs to receive special rewards .

These aspects of radio are not found inside a radio station building or
owned by one radio company.. These are industries created out of another
industry�s shortcomings. People rely on these new businesses for music, for
talk entertainment, and for music identification the way they once relied on
one radio industry.

INTERNET MASHES RADIO INTO LITTLE BITTY PIECES!

Don’t think radio’s a-changin’?  Don’t think that radio hasn’t spawned several business that will someday in the next few years overtake it?

Over the past few years, radio has seen a decline in listeners mostly to a website called Pandora.com that plays music based on the listener’s tastes.  So far the online radio service has topped 40 million registered users. Radio’s one advantage, of use solely in automobiles, is being usurped by advancing technology such as Pandora entering Ford automobiles ().  Other Internet only radio stations have taken some of radio’s listeners including LastFM.com which similarly to Pandora plays an Internet station tailor-made to the consumer.  Over 35 million users come to this website every month.

 Disc Jockeys are finding work outside the traditional radio model as well.  Adam Carrolla, who once was a morning talk-show host in Los Angeles, was fired when his radio station switched formats.  He immediately bought some basic recording equipment from a local music shop and started a podcast or show made specifically for downloading off the internet.  His programs have been downloaded more than 50 million times over the past year, and Carrolla himself says that he feels radio’s future lies in podcasts rather than traditional radio or the satellite radio provider Sirius XM.

 The role that was once played by many DJ’s, to announce the title and artists of songs played on the radio, has been replaced by one of countless apps or programs downloaded to smart phones over the Internet.  The world’s leading app for song identification is Shazam.  This program “listens” to the song playing from a radio or other source and identifies it.   This has lead to bigger sales of the songs identified by Shazam, and now the company is partnering with the television cable network, Syfy.   The promotion asks users of Shazam to identify certain songs played during one of the Syfy programs to receive special rewards .

 These aspects of radio are not found inside a radio station building or owned by one radio company..  These are industries created out of another industry’s shortcomings.  People rely on these new businesses for music, for talk entertainment, and for music identification the way they once relied on one radio industry.

THIS IS
THIS IS “EFFIZODE” 17 OF “THE LAST PLACE ON EARTH!” BATTERIES NOT INCLUDED.

Hello I’m Mike Matthews on the bus taking us to THE LAST PLACE ON EARTH!
We’ll hear from Gaan, Hot Fire, the Pop Winds, and our up-coming musical
guest Tristen. We’ll also dive into the growing apparent extinction of what
was once known as “radio” and find out who the unassuming pioneers are who
are slowly taking away the last of radio’s fan base. You’re entering
another dimension…up ahead…THE LAST PLACE ON EARTH!

As I write this to you I am on a procrastination binge for my paper that I
need to write by this time tomorrow. It’s a simple paper…simply a
paper…one stinkin’ paper…one stinkin’ page! HOW CAN THIS BE SO
DIFFICULT!?! Because, yes, I am back to school. Local community college
(the school where Tom Hanks went) but I am back to school!

I had to put my paper on hold as I saw a very important milestone approach.
I had to literally, rather, figuratively, pull off to the side of this
academic road to record and bring to you EFFIZODE 17 of THE LAST PLACE ON
EARTH! That’s a milestone because my last show, THE MESSY DESK, only
reached to effizode 16 due to my wife and I moving the hell outta Alabama.
So nice to finally reach and surpass this former finish line. It’s now
onward and upward. (Of course, if I never finish this paper, it’s outward
and flunk-ward!)

Thanks for reading this quick, short blog. I just had to let you know my
excitement and happiness about being back in school and back on your mp3
player. Researching is so different now from when I was in school (you’ll
get a clear time-line from my opening song this week). You now can use
google! How cool is that! I think I’m pretty good at that already so
hopefully I’ll get something a little north of a “D!”

Oh, this week on my little segment called “Mike’s Scavenger Hunt” we go to a
cool place I found in Sonora over the New Years weekend with my friends
Christy and Jason. If you like candy you’ll love hearing about this place.
It’s a place of pure imagination!

Please tell your friends about this show and listen to the latest by
clicking here…

http://ping.fm/GGr0n

Of course you can subscribe to this show on the new iTunes site (as of 3
weeks ago because Podbean sucks!) by going to
http://ping.fm/E4GeD

Thanks and keep an eye out for my upcoming interviews with some cool artists
including Tristen and the group Eulogy!

Now, back to my paper. No, seriously.

Mike